It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 1/22/18

Etta, Bella, and I are eager to share our latest reads for It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR is a community of bloggers who link up to share what they are reading. Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen Vincent of Teach Mentor Texts decided to give it a #kidlit focus and encourage everyone who participates to visit at least 3 of the other #kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.img_2105

Our Reads This Week:

R is for Rebel  by J. Anderson Coats

Three generations before Malley was born, the country of Milea was conquered by the New Wealds. After her parents were imprisoned for being resisters to the new government, Malley was sent to a national school. The school’s mission is to reform Malley and other young girls to be loyal Wealdan subjects and train them for domestic service.  From the very first chapter, it is very clear that Malley is her parents’ daughter and is not willing to be reeducated.  She wants to do something song worthy, like her Milean ancestors. At first, she thinks she is alone in her fight, but as the story unfolds, Malley notices that other girls quietly subscribe to the same beliefs as her.  She soon realizes that resistance is all around her in many different forms.

R is for Rebel is a novel that left me thinking and questioning.  As Malley stated,  “It’s one thing to lose something; another thing to entirely give it up.”  When I first began reading, I wasn’t quite sure if R is for Rebel was a historical fiction or a fantasy.  In the end, it doesn’t matter because like other dystopian novels, Malley’s story teaches us an important lesson-to always personally fight for what you most value.

Special thanks to J. Anderson Coats for providing our #bookexcursion group with an ARC of R is for Rebel.  Look for its release in February 2018.

Isadora Moon Goes to Schoolby Harriet Muncaster

Isadora is special because she is half fairy and half vampire.  The time has come for her to attend school, but does Isadora belong in fairy school or vampire school?  In this first book of the series, Isadora amusingly discovers whether she is more fairy, more vampire or perhaps, she is something all her own. After all, different can beautiful too!

Young readers at my school will definitely sink their fangs into this transitional chapter book series.  Harriet Muncaster’s illustrations are gorgeous using only black and pink colors.  Students will be able to relate to Isadora who is learning about her own identify and how she fits in.

Currently, there are four published books in the U.S..  The fifth book, Isadora Moon Goes to the Ballet will be released on January 23, 2018.  Special thanks to fellow #bookexcursion member Amber Webb for introducing me to the Isadora Moon series.

The Bat Can Bat by Gene Barretta

Homonyms, homophones, and homographs?  No wonder children get confused!

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Permission to post visual granted from Kearson’s Classroom Blog.

Gene Barretta to the rescue! Author of picture books such as Dear Deerand Zoola Palooza is back with The Bat Can Bat, a fun and engaging picture book that teach homonyms, words that have different meanings but sound and are spelled the same.

Set at an athletic event, The Bat Can Bat features 2 homonyms on each page spread.  Readers can use context as well as the illustrations to identify the different meanings of each homonym.   The illustrations are especially important because they provide a visual to support students in understanding each word’s multiple meanings.  Last year, my school had a school-wide focus on teaching multiple meaning words. The Bat Can Bat would have been a great resource for teachers.  Makes me want to revive our initiative!

Special thanks to fellow #bookexcursion member Allison Stout for getting an ARC of The Bat Can Bat from Macmillian Children’s Publishing at the 2017 NCTE convention.

Featured Dog Selection of the Week

Wanting to spread the dog love, Beagles and Books has a weekly feature of highlighting a literary selection with a canine main character.

Frankie by Mary Sullivan

The story begins with Francine affectionately called Frankie leaving the shelter.  As soon as Frankie enters her foster home, she takes in her new surroundings especially things like a ball, bone, toys and a bed.  Frankie quickly realizes all these things belong to Nico, the family dog, and Nico is not willing to share.  Will Frankie get her own toys or will Nico learn to share?

Frankie is a story with few words but a lot of heart.  The adorable illustrations visually tell the story and capture both Frankie and Nico’s emotions. Frankie hits close to home because the story was inspired by author/illustrator Mary Sullivan’s real foster puppy Frankie and a portion of the book’s proceeds are being donated to the shelter Austin Pets Alive.  Shelter pups are dear to my heart because both Etta and Bella are rescues. Luckily, from the first day we brought Bella home, Etta has been very willing to share and still does.

Etta, Bella, and I thank you for visiting Beagles and Books.  Have a great week! Happy Reading!

#Bookexcursion

Stegothesaurus by Bridget Heos Illustrated by T.L. McBeth

Once upon a time, there were three dinosaurs. A stegosaurus, another stegosaurus and a stegothesaurus!  While the first two brothers use simple words like big to describe a mountain, their brother Stegothesaurus uses robust words like gargantuan, gigantic, and Goliath.

The three brothers’ tranquil day comes to a halt when an allosaurus suddenly startles them.  Because Stegothesaurus was thinking of rich vocabulary like frightening and formidable to describe their predator, he was unable to escape with his brothers.  Stegothesaurus though soon learns that she isn’t an allosaurus, but rather an allothesaurus.  But wait, how did she learn all these so many rich and powerful words?  Read to find out!

 

Stegothesaurus is truly a teacher’s dream picture book. T.L. McBeth’s endearing and adorable drawings of the dinosaur brothers warmly show their range of emotions.   Not only will students love the story, but also I cannot think of a better way to teach the power of using synonyms in our oral and written language. What I love about Bridget Heos’ creative story is that Stegothesaurus uses multiple synonyms to describe things so teachers can also introduces shades of meaning.  Which word is stronger?  Gargantuan, gigantic or Goliath?

Special thanks to Christian Trimmer of Henry Holt Books for Young Readers for sending my #bookexcursion group an advance reader’s copy.  Stegothesaurus has a release date of June 2018.

#Bookexcursion

The Unlikely Story of a Pig in the City by Jodi Kendall

Being one of five kids living in a cramped city house, Josie Shilling feels invisible.  Except for gymnastics, Josie does not have anything that is truly her own.

So when Josie’s college age brother Tom brings home a piglet named Hamlet on Thanksgiving, Josie instantly clicks with the little runt.  She convinces her parents to let her keep Hamlet with the stipulation she must find the piglet a home by New Year’s Day.

The Unlikely Story of a Pig in a City will warm both your heart and soul.  As the New Year approaches, Josie discovers that her love for Hamlet opens her eyes and mind to her other talents besides gymnastics.  As a dog mom, I can totally relate to how my love for my pups changed my life. Josie also comes to realize that her family truly does see her and has and will always be her biggest cheerleader.  What powerful messages for readers for all ages!

Special thanks to Jodi Kendall who provided our #bookexcursion group with an ARC prior to The Unlikely Story of a Pig in a City’s October 2017 publication.

#Bookexcursion

Stella Diaz Has Something to Say by Angela Dominguez

Happy Book Birthday to Angela Dominguez and Stella Diaz Has Something to Say!

Stella Diaz is a third grade student who loves to write stories, draw, and read about marine animals. While she is a very good student, Stella is not confident in her language abilities; as a Mexican American, she accidentally speaks Spanish instead of English and turns roja in embarrassment.   This year, school is also more challenging because her best friend Jenny is in another class, which makes Stella feel lonely.

Stella is excited about researching fish for her animal project, but she is nervous about having to present in front of her whole class including the new student Stanley. And it doesn’t help that one of her fellow classmates always picks on her for being quiet.  Fortunately, Stella has the support of her mom, older brother Nick, and best friend Jenny to make her realize her strength.  As her mom told her, “That’s why your full name is Estrella.  You’re my star.  You can light up the dark.”  Can Stella live up to her name?

Stella Diaz Has Something to Say is such a delightful novel.  Children can identify with Stella with a variety of reasons.  Her parents are divorced and she has a strained relationship with her father.  She is shy and finds it difficult to make friends.  I fell in immediately fell in love with Stella and was rooting for her to find her strength.  I appreciate the author’s note where Angela Dominquez shares that Stella’s story is 82.9% based on her own childhood and how like Stella, we all must discover our inner starfish. In addition, Dominguez’s black and white illustrations appear throughout the novel and visually enhance Stella’s story.

Special thanks to Angela Dominguez for sharing an ARC of Stella Diaz Has Something to Say with our #bookexcursion group.  It will be released on January 16, 2018.

This review was originally published on December 11, 2017. Please click here.

Book Excursion Kidlit Picture Books MGLit

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 1/15/18

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Etta, Bella, and I are eager to share our latest reads for It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR is a community of bloggers who link up to share what they are reading. Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen Vincent of Teach Mentor Texts decided to give it a #kidlit focus and encourage everyone who participates to visit at least 3 of the other #kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Our Reads This Week:

Night of the Living Cuddle Bunnies by Jonathan Rosen

Devin is an ordinary 12-year-old boy.  He desperately wants an iPhone and his little sister Abby gets on his nerves with her constant temper tantrums.  When movers carry in a huge pot and giant glass ball to a house across the street from Devin’s family, his cousin Tommy is convinced that the new neighbor is a warlock.  Normally, Devin does not believe in Tommy’s conspiracy theories, but his feelings begin to waver when Herb comes over for dinner and then the next day when he drops off a Cuddle Bunny, the hottest toy of the Christmas season for Abby.   When the Cuddle Bunny comes to life, Devin realizes Herb is responsible; therefore, Tommy’s theory is actually true.  Since his parents do not believe him, Devin and Tommy are left to expose Herb and in the meantime, save their town from being overrun by the evil Cuddle Bunnies.

Reading Night of the Living Cuddle Bunnies took me back to my childhood.   In 1983,  I vividly remember going to Toys R Us and writing my name on a wait list for a Cabbage Patch Doll, the most in-demand toy of the year.  In addition, there is a scene in the book where all the Cuddle Bunnies are reeking havoc at the mall; I laughed hysterically recalling the movie Gremlins, one of my brother’s and my favorite movies.

Night of the Living Cuddle Bunnies is a fast paced, hilarious story that middle grade readers will devour; adult readers my age will equally enjoy it since it allows us to take that trip down memory lane.  I also loved the book because Devin truly changes and grows in his quest to locate and eliminate the head bunny, Mr. Flopsy-Ears.  And stay tuned because the ending gives me hope for another adventure with Devin and Tommy.

A very special thanks to Jonathan Rosen for fulfilling one of my Christmas wishes and sending me a copy of Night of Living Cuddle Bunnies during #MGBookmas.   I loved this “hare raising” story and excited to share and discuss it with readers at my school!

Zoey and Sassafras: Marshmallows and Dragons by Asia Citro  Illustrated by Marion Lindsay

Zoey is an inquisitive young scientist who is always exploring, observing, and thinking with her trusty kitty Sassafras.  When she needs to think of brilliant ideas. Zoey wears her Thinking Goggles on top of her head because they are closer to her brain.  One day,  she notices a purple frog in a photo on her mom’s desk.  Her mom is amazed that Zoey can see Pip, one of the many magical animals that live in the forest.

While her mom off to conference, Zoey is charged with helping any injured animals that come to their barn. Patiently Zoey waits for the barn bell to sound.  It is not until late in the week that Zoey hears the ring and anxiously runs to find a sick baby dragon.  Using her schema as well as the scientific method, Zoey works diligently to uncover how to help the dragon named Marshmallow get better.  I especially love how Zoey documents all her notes in her science journal (which were written and drawn by Asia’s own daughter).

I am always on the look out for books for my transitional readers.  Look no further than Zoey and Sassafras. Currently, there are 4 books in the series with a fifth book publishing in April 2018. This series hits the mark on so many levels with a curious main character, short chapters, rich vocabulary, adorable illustrations, and of course, magical animals!  Can’t wait to introduce Zoey to readers at my school especially my second grade literacy lunch bunch.

I am Famous by Tara Luebbe and Becky Cattie Illustrated by Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

Told from Kiely’s point of view,  it is no wonder that she consider herself to be famous.  Since the day she was born, the paparazzi (her parents) have been taking and sharing photos of her, and her mailbox is always full of mail from her fan club (her grandma).

Kiely’s biggest show is performing at her Grandpa’s birthday party and when she reaches the stage, she sees the house is packed with her fans.  Of course, no performance is without its glitches, but Kiely knows the show must go on.  Her mantra is just keep smiling!   During the grand finale, Kiely briefly forgets her optimism, but luckily, her audience is right there to pick her up and support her.

I am Famous is a book to which all children can relate.  In this age of social media, children are used to being photographed not only for major milestones but also for performing the most minor tasks.  What I love most about I am Famous is a new definition for fame-having a family who loves you, no matter what!

A very special thanks to Tara Luebbe for sending an advance reading copy of  I Am Famous to Beagles and Books, which I will be sharing with my #bookexcursion group. Preorder now, for I Am Famous will be published in March 2018.

Featured Dog Selection of the Week

Wanting to spread the dog love, Beagles and Books has a weekly feature by highlighting a literary selection with a canine main character.

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A Dog Wearing Shoes by Sangmi Ko

On the way home, Mini and her mom find a lost dog in the road.  Mini wants to keep the dog for her own, but her mom reminds her, ‘He has shoes.  He belongs to someone.”  Mini and her mom go to the park where the dog with shoes garners a lot of attention  performing tricks.  When she takes him off leash to fetch a bone, the dog runs away leaving one shoe behind, and Mini heartbroken.

The next day, Mini’s mom takes her to the dog shelter in hopes of finding the dog.  Miraculously, the dog wearing only three shoes is there!  Knowing how awful it felt to lose him, Mini puts up fliers realizing that there is probably someone out there missing him too.  After the dog is reunited with his owner, Mini and her mom know just where to go-the animal shelter.

From the beautiful written story, the heartwarming black and white illustrations with a just dab of color to the incredible message, A Dog Wearing Shoes is now one of my all time favorite dog books ever.  At the end of the book, the author includes information on how to adopt a dog with links to websites like Petfinder.com

Thank you so much for visiting Beagles and Books!  Have a great week!  Happy Reading!

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 1/8/18

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Etta, Bella, and I are back for our first It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? in 2018! #IMWAYR is a community of bloggers who link up to share what they are reading. Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen Vincent of Teach Mentor Texts decided to give it a #kidlit focus and encourage everyone who participates to visit at least 3 of the other #kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Our Reads This Week:

Babysitting Nightmares: The Shadow Hand by Kat Shepherd

Like Rebecca Chin, I loved to babysit when I was her age.  I loved caring for kids, demonstrating my maturity and of course, making my own money.  But if a child’s locked window mysteriously opened and a layer of cold and slimy moss appeared on the windowsill, I highly doubt that I would have babysat for Kyle again, must less any other child.

In spite of these unexplained occurrences, a visibly shaken Rebecca keeps her cool and continues to babysit Kyle.  Kyle’s mother admits he has been acting a little off, but perhaps it is just teething.  When she puts Kyle to bed, she notices small handprints on the wall and even on the ceiling.  On another occasion, Kyle bites friend and fellow sitter Clio and nips Rebecca exposing two row of white, pointed teeth.  Something is definitely not right.

Babysitting Nightmares is described as Baby Sitter’s Club meets Goosebumps.  I agree that is a perfect description for The Shadow Hand, which I hope is the first book in the series.  Rebecca and her fellow sitters band together to discover what is happening to Kyle and risk their own lives to save him before it’s too late.  I cannot wait to share this series with students.  It’s fast paced and under 200 pages so kids will quickly devour this novel. While spooky at times, the story also has a great message-None can rule the heart that loves.

Special thanks to Kat Shepherd for sharing an ARC of Babysitting Nightmares with my #bookexcursion group.  It will be released in June 2018.

Arts and Thefts by Allison K. Hymas

Do not call Jeremy Wilderson a detective.  He is a retrieval specialist who helps his fellow middle school peers get back what is rightfully theirs.  When one of his best friends and talented artist Case is accused of stealing brushes and paints from another student, Jeremy is incensed.  Especially because the accusation is coming from his nemesis, Becca Mills, the town’s tiny yet terrifying private detective.

Becca believes that the brushes were intentionally stolen to sabotage artwork entered in the Scottsville Art Show,  the most important competition of the summer.  Becca’s hunch comes true, and Jeremy is worried about his best friend.  With Case’s painting in the show, Jeremy is determined to not only clear his best friend’s name but also protect Case’s art from being a target of the saboteur.  Even if it means having to team up for a second time with Becca. (Read Under Lock and Key to find out about their first alliance, which was kept secret from Jeremy’s friends Case and Hack.)  Reluctantly, Becca agrees, and the two covertly join forces to retrieve the stolen paint and brushes and capture the culprit.

I love a good mystery, and Arts and Thefts does not disappoint.  I applaud Jeremy for his loyalty to his dear friend Case, which drives him to join forces with Becca.  Jeremy and Becca’s banter was truly the highlight of the book because while they mostly disagree, they make an amazing team.  Makes me hopeful for another Jeremy-Becca alliance in perhaps Book 3?

Special thanks to Allison Hymas for sharing an ARC of Arts and Thefts with my #bookexcursion group.  Arts and Thefts will be released in February 2018.

Hawk Rising by Maria Gianferrari  Illustrated by Brian Floca

Hawk Rising is a narrative non-fiction picture book which tells the story of mother and daughter observing a father hawk hunting for prey for his family.

At the beginning, the mood is calm with both the family and the hawk waking up to begin their day.  Father Hawk perches at the top of a pole to survey the land for his family’s next meal.  The mother and daughter notice the hawk from their suburban backyard.

The mood quickly turns tense as Father Hawk swoops down to catch a chipmunk. To the hawk’s dismay, the rodent escapes running under a porch.  However, Father Hawk is not deterred and continues his search for food even as the sun is setting for the night.  The story has a thrilling ending with Father Hawk victorious in his quest to feed his brood.

I am a such fan of Maria Gianferari’s writing.  The text is true poetry, for she chooses her words carefully to dramatically describe the family’s actions and feelings as well as the hawk’s pursuit.  Coupling Maria Gianferrari’s words with Brian Floca’s illustrations, the story takes flight.  Floca’s illustration vividly convey not only Father Hawk’s determination, but also the young daughter’s apprehension of seeing the hawk succeed in his mission.

Special thanks to Maria Gianferrari for sharing an ARC of Hawk Rising with my #bookexcursion group.  It will be published in May 2018.

Our Featured Dog Selection of the Week:

Granted by John David Anderson

Wanting to spread the dog love, Beagles and Books has a new weekly feature by highlighting a literary selection with a canine main character.

Pretty much any book with a dog has my heart so Granted’s cover alone compelled me to read this novel. Being a fan of John David Anderson, I knew it would be a great story and boy, did he deliver.

Ophelia Delphinium Fidgets is a fairy, but not just any fairy.  She is a Granter, which gives her the opportunity to grant the wishes of humans.  Eager Ophelia is finally sent on her first assignment-to give a purple bike to a girl named Kasarah.   Her mission is pretty simple.  Travel to an Ohio mall. Retrieve Kasarah’s coin from a fountain.  Sprinkle a little fairy dust.  Say those four magic words. Your wish is granted.  Boom. Bam. Done.

But Ophelia encounters more obstacles than she anticipated, and her mission does not progress as planned.  Ophelia’s silver lining is befriending a nameless stray dog who comes to her aid when she is injured. She bestows him the name, Sam.  At first, Sam is her travel companion on her quest to grant Kasarah’s wish; but to Ophelia’s surprise, he becomes so much more-her friend.  I love Ophelia for her pluckiness and determination, but I cannot deny.  Sam got my heart.

Granted is a magical story about having faith, filling empty holes, and following your heart not the rules.  Ophelia and Sam also remind readers what is truly important-having a haven where people love you and care for you, no matter what.

Special thanks to fellow #bookexcursion member Lisa Maucione who received an ARC of Granted from Harper Collins at NCTE.  Granted will be published in February 2018.

Thanks for visiting Beagles and Books! Happy reading!

#Bookexcursion

Hawk Rising by Maria Gianferrari

Hawk Rising by Maria Gianferrari  Illustrated by Brian Floca

Hawk Rising is a narrative non-fiction picture book which tells the story of mother and daughter observing a father hawk hunting for prey for his family.

At the beginning, the mood is calm with both the family and the hawk waking up to begin their day.  Father Hawk perches at the top of a pole to survey the land for his family’s next meal.  The mother and daughter notice the hawk from their suburban backyard.

The mood quickly turns tense as Father Hawk swoops down to catch a chipmunk. To the hawk’s dismay, the rodent escapes running under a porch.  However, Father Hawk is not deterred and continues his search for food even as the sun is setting for the night.  The story has a thrilling ending with Father Hawk victorious in his quest to feed his brood.

I am a such fan of Maria Gianferari’s writing.  The text is true poetry, for she chooses her words carefully to dramatically describe the family’s actions and feelings as well as the hawk’s pursuit.  Coupling Maria Gianferrari’s words with Brian Floca’s illustrations, the story takes flight.  Floca’s illustration vividly convey not only Father Hawk’s determination, but also the young daughter’s apprehension of seeing the hawk succeed in his mission.

Special thanks to Maria Gianferrari for sharing an ARC of Hawk Rising with my #bookexcursion group.  It will be published in May 2018.

#Bookexcursion

Fenway & Hattie Up to New Tricks by Victoria Coe

Happy Book Birthday to Fenway and Hattie Up to New Tricks!

In the third book in the series, Fenway has definitely adjusted to his new suburban home. Told from his point of view, Fenway shares his excitement playing with Hattie in the Dog Park (backyard) and hanging out with his canine neighbors, Goldie and Patches.  But Fenway does not like the chipmunk that is invading his territory and spreading its horrible odor everywhere!

While enjoying a game of keep away, Fenway spies that menacing chipmunk. In his quest to catch the chipmunk, Fenway gets stung on his paw by bees. Ouch! The story continues with Fenway’s account of visiting the vet (aka Spicy Breath and Table of Panic) and enduring the Cone of Doom. Hattie is supposed to his best buddy but she keeps giving him baths in a wading pool and applying yucky cream on his paw. Being a dog is tough!

Etta can emphasize with Fenway. She has first hand experience with the Cone of Doom.  She did not like it either Fenway!

img_1401Each time I read Fenway & Hattie, I know that I am blessed to have Etta (and now Bella) in my life. Having the unconditional love of a dog is a precious gift. Thank you Victoria for that beautiful reminder.

After reading Fenway & Hattie for the Global Read Aloud, a second grade class at my school continued and read Fenway & Hattie and the Evil Bunny Gang. I can’t wait to share Up to New Tricks with the class tomorrow!

Special thanks to Victoria for providing our #bookexcursion group with an advance reader copy of Fenway & Hattie Up to New Tricks, which was published today on January 2, 2018.

Uncategorized

My Must Reads in 2018

I have always been a reader, but 2017 was a BIG reading year for me. In June, I renewed my love for picture books and began sharing #bookaday posts on Twitter with my sweet beagle Etta. In July, I joined #bookexcursion, a group of 10 educators who share a passion for reading, sharing, and reviewing kidlit from picture books to chapter books. In August, I launched my blog, Beagles and Books with the help of Etta and shared my first blog post for #pb10for10. In September, I joined the kidlit blogging community to share my favorite weekly reads with #IMWAYR.

To launch 2018, it is only fitting to now add #mustreadin2018. I am joining Carrie Gelson of There’s A Book for That and community of other book bloggers. Thanks Carrie for the encouragement. I chose the following 20 middle grade books that I will make a priority to read this year. Some are books in my TBR stack that weren’t read in 2017, some are #bookexcursion ARCs generously provided by authors, and others are titles recommended by book bloggers I follow on Goodreads and Twitter.

As an elementary reading specialist, I also do not want to forget the importance of continuing to build my content knowledge for teaching reading; therefore, I have also included 3 professional reads to support my work with both students and teachers.

Let the reading begin!

#Bookexcursion

The Problim Children by Natalie Lloyd

 

The Problim Children by Natalie Lloyd  Illustrated by Julie Sarda

When their family bungalow in the Swampy Woods blows up, the seven Problim siblings, Mona, Toot, Wendell, Thea, Frida, Sal, and Sundae (all born on a different day of the week), are homeless.  To make matters worst, sibling Thea keeps seeing sevens and “when you are a Problim and sevens start piling up, trouble is headed in your direction.” But oldest sibling Sundae reminds everyone of the family motto-every Problim is a gift. Thankfully, Sundae recalls seven years ago she buried the deed to their Grandpa Simon’s house, and views this document as their family’s new beginning.

On the very day the Problem children arrive in the town of Lost Cove to move into their Grandpa’s house, Number Seven is up on the auction block.  Thump, bump.  Desdemona O’pinion, owner of House Number Five, has been impatiently waiting for seven years to purchase Number Seven and does not want the Problim children thwarting her plan. As a compromise, the mayor decides that the siblings have 21 days to produce documentation that they are indeed Problims.  If they cannot prove their lineage, Desdemona’s threat to separate them and send them each to a different continent could become a reality. Thump bump.

While the siblings work together to uncover their grandfather’s secret and keep their family intact, one sibling Thea grapples not only with her relationship with her twin Wendell but also with her own identity. I must admit that Thea is my favorite Problim. Always viewing the old phrase “Thursday’s child has far to go” as a negative, Thea learns to think differently. Instead of trying to catch up, perhaps Thea can go anywhere she wants.

The Problim Children is a story that has it all-eccentric yet loveable characters, a family secret, magic, mayhem, a dastardly villianess, and last but certainly not least, over 200 types of toots.* You will laugh, cry, but most of all, cheer for the Problims! Collectively, the siblings teach us “when you are loved, you are never alone.”

Thank you so much Natalie Lloyd for sending an ARC of The Problim Children to my #bookexcursion group.  In true Priblim fashion, readers should pile up and pre-order now, for Problim Children will be released in February 2018.

*All courtesy of Toot Problem