Literati Kids Book Club

A Review of Literati Kids Book Clubs (Month 2)

Literati (2)

Disclosure: Beagles and Books was provided a complimentary product in exchange for its honest review.

About a month ago,  I shared my initial thoughts on Literati Kids Book Clubs.  In that post, I discussed how as a reading specialist, I am asked to provide parents with book recommendations.  Literati opened my eyes to the fact that my book lists always focused on fiction and neglected to suggest nonfiction options.  Cultivating independent readers is not only about reading picture books, chapter books, and/or novels.  Some kids may be more interested in reading an illustrated nonfiction book or an interactive book with puzzles and games.  Interest is the most important factor in order to engage young readers.

Last week, I received a second Literati Kids box and wanted to continue to share my honest thoughts about the books curated for this month.

Which Literati Kid Book Club is Best for Your Child? 

A friendly reminder that there are 6 options for book clubs. 

  • Neo-newborn to 3 years
  • Sprout-ages 3 to 5
  • Nova-ages 5 to 7
  • Sage-ages 7 to 9
  • Phoenix– ages 9 to 12
  • Titan– 13 and up

Visiting the Literati website will provide you with more information about the types of books curated for each club.  Since I mostly work with children transitioning to chapter book reading, Club Sage was the best choice for me. 



What Was Inside My Literati Box?

Early Chapter Books 

This month, my box contained 3 early chapter books.  What I especially love is that all books curated for this month are the first installment in a series.  Chapter book series are a great way to hook a reader because the first book will introduce the main characters, setting, and plot structure.  The subsequent books in the series feel familiar making them easier to read.  In addition, most series are written in the same style which can be reassuring to a young reader.  

  • Henry Heckelbeck Gets a Dragon by Wanda Coven Illustrated by Priscilla Burris
    Heidi Heckelbeck’s younger brother gets his own series!   In case you weren’t aware, all the women in Henry’s family are witches.  He and his dad are just regular people which suits Henry fine.  In this first book of the series, it’s Henry’s first day of school. As he gathers 3 things for his All About Me bag, he wants to add his remote control dragon and finds a book with a spell to make the dragon come alive.  Will the spell work? With large print and illustrations on every page, this series is perfect for budding chapter book readers. (119 pages)

     

  • Sofia Martinez: My Family Adventure by Jacqueline Jules Illustrated by Kim Smith
    The youngest of the Martinez sister, Sofia is determined to stand out. The first book in the series includes three chapters-a plan to look different from her sisters on picture day, making a pinata for her abuela, and taking care of friend’s class pet.  Through it all, Sofia encounters some problems but always finds ways to solve them.  Colorful illustrations will draw in young readers as well as the opportunity to learn Spanish words and phrases.  (91 pages)
  • Dino Riders: How to Tame a Triceratops  by Will Date
    Josh Sanders lives in the Lost Plains where cowboys ride dinosaurs. He loves his trusty gallimus, Plodder, but he wants to be like his hero, Terrordactyl Bill. Josh is also fed up with his all time worst enemy. Amos, making fun of Plodder and his lack of speed. Competing in the 100th Anniversary of Trihorn Race is the opportunity to prove himself. And even better-Terrordactyl Bill would present the first place trophy to the winner.   So when Josh has the opportunity to trade two of family’s iguanodons for a triceratops, he is excited but his parents are furious.  Can Josh train the triceratops in time to not only enter but also win the race? With an inventive setting, intriguing plot, illustrations, and maps, Dino Riders has a lot of kid appeal.  (107 pages)

Interactive Books

Along with the chapter books were interactive books that will engage young minds. 

  • True Detective: Mind-Bending Visual Riddles for Young Sleuths
    For kids who enjoy solving riddles, True Detective features three levels of puzzles: beginner sleuth, advanced sleuth, and super sleuth.  The goal is to identify the hard-to-spot difference when looking at very similar objects.  Page spreads may have up to 98 like items which can challenge even the best eyes and brains.

     

  • Illumisaurus by Carnovsky Written by Lucy Brownridge
    Take a trip back to prehistoric times when dinosaurs roamed the Earth.  Illumisaurus is organized by parts of the world.  In each area, sections include Where in the World, The Observation Deck, and Species Guide.  Children will be thoroughly engaged using the magic viewing lens as a tool to explore and learn.  Use the red lens to reveal dinosaurs, the green lens to see the location, and the blue lens to uncover plants and prehistorical animals. Hours and hours of discovery and facts await!

Other Goodies!

  • A collectible poster featuring original art by illustrator duo Carnovsky
  • Personalized bookplates

How Does the Club Work?

As a subscriber, children receive 5 expertly curated age-appropriate books. I was greatly pleased to see the books were all recently published.  The subscription runs at $9.95 a month. You only get charged for the ones you keep. There is a price breakdown of each book on the included packing list so you know how much each one will cost.

What I love is children can touch, open, skim, and read a portion of each book to decide which are a good fit for them.  You only keep the books they want and return the rest for free with the included pre-paid return shipping label.  Literati Kids books match or are less than Amazon pricing which I greatly appreciate.

If you’re interested in trying out Literati Kids a try, click here for 25% off your first box. 

Bella and I sincerely grateful to Literati Kids for sharing this another book box in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.